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Archive for June, 2010

You might think that the people who have been running the US operation in Afghanistan for the last few years would show a bit more maturity than a bunch of fourteen-year-old valley girls.

You’d be wrong.

On Friday, however, officials close to McChrystal began trying to salvage his reputation by asserting that the author, Michael Hastings, quoted the general and his staff in conversations that he was allowed to witness but not report.

“You said you wouldn’t tell anyone!  You pinky-swore!  I thought we were friends!  I’m never going out to the movies with you ever again!”

Oh, and this:

A U.S. military spokesman in Kabul, Air Force Lt. Col. Edward T. Sholtis, acknowledged that Hastings, like other reporters who have interviewed McChrystal over the past year, was not required to sign written ground rules. “We typically manage ground rules on a verbal basis,” Sholtis said. “We trust in the professionalism of the people we’re working with.”

Ground rules?!  What the fuck are you talking about “ground rules?”  You assholes are using my tax money to murder innocent people in a country halfway around the world for no goddamn reason at all, and you’re openly slagging your boss in front of a MAGAZINE REPORTER for christsakes, and the reporter went and REPORTED your borderline-treasonous insubordination, and now you have the fucking gall to whine about “ground rules?”

Here’s a ground rule for you, you worthless bag of guts: be happy you haven’t yet been charged with committing war crimes, and shut the HELL up before someone corrects the oversight.

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Everyone in patent law (and in software, and in pension management) is waiting breathlessly for the Supreme Court to issue an opinion in Bilski.  Everyone agrees that it’s probably Justice Stevens (who is regarded as a patent minimalist) authoring the opinion.  Likewise everyone agrees that the decision, when it comes,  will be bad for business-method patents.  People with idiot business-method patents, like Jeff Bezos and his infamous Amazon 1-click patent, are sad about this.  On the other hand, most people who actually create and invent stuff are genuinely happy.  The only real controversy at this point is how far the court will go: will it strike only business method patents, or will it rule that no software should be included in the list of patentable subject matter.  But the thing is, it’s (at least nominally) Bilski bringing this fight, trying to keep his ridiculous business method patent alive!  If it seems so clear that he’s going to lose, why not just give up now and avoid setting precedent?

I make no bones about my position- I’m anti-patent in general, and anti-biz-method / software patent in particular.

So when I saw this post from George Washington Law Prof John Duffy at Patently-O, I was afraid at first that he was giving Bilski to escape being hoist on his own flawed petard.  But when you get to the end of the article you find this gem:

I had previously thought that “irrational exuberance” provided the best answer—that the Bilski petitioners were likely to remain unrealistically optimistic about their chances for success right up to the end. But the presence of a multibillion-dollar corporation controlling the litigation decreases the chances that the strategy is due to simple inventor over-optimism.

It seems that Bilski sold the patent at issue … to a corporation that apparently wants to have business method patents killed off entirely.

Oops.

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I guess that depends whether you are (a) someone who enjoys music and art and culture, or (b) a parasite

Peer-to-peer file-sharing on the Internet has certainly weakened copyright, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing unless one equates “stronger copyright” with “better copyright.” According to the US Constitution, copyright is about promoting “the Progress of Science and useful Arts”; it’s not about enriching authors […]

[T]he most pertinent question to ask is […] Has file-sharing reduced creators’ incentives?

My knee-jerk answer is– of course not!  More people are creating and publishing creative works today than at any other point in history.  But I didn’t have any data to back that up, and knee-jerk reactions only work as a basis for policy when Republicans are in power, so anyone who hopes for meaningful change in the US copyright framework is going to need more ammunition.  Fortunately, someone has actually done a bit of research now, and you can read more about it here.

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The Wall Street Journal reports that venture capitalists are becoming more interested in businesses concerning privacy.

via Privacy Lives » Blog Archive » Wall Street Journal: Funds Invest in Privacy Start-Ups.

That might actually be a really good fit for me.

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Get your free “Prosecute BP” bumper sticker.

all you need to do is to send us a LEGAL SIZE envelope s.a.s.e. otherwise we have to fold your sticker to this address:Sticker Robot / ProsecutePO Box 1189Woodacre, CA.94973-1189 subject to availability.We will gladly send you a sticker or two, depending on the response to this offer.

via Free Prosecute BP Sticker from Sticker Robot!.

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So, Obama comes along, says “set up a 20 billion fund, have an independent administrator in charge, and start paying damages.” He had no power to order that. But BP said, “yes, sir.” And it was done.

via “A Mind-Boggling Accomplishment” | Talking Points Memo.

There was an infamous quote that made the rounds during W’s administration.  I don’t remember if it was sourced to any one person- Wikipedia tells me no.  But the quote above describing Obama’s role in forcing BP to create the $20 B fund put me in a mind of the story about the Bushies creating a new reality.

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Calendar World Cup 2010 by MARCA.com.  It’s the best because it allows you to view the matches in any relevant format you want- date, team, location, or group.  Far superior to the official FIFA site.  Stuff like this makes me love the internet…

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